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What is Quartz stone
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What is Quartz stone





Engineered Quartz stone is artificial stone consist of 94% quartzite and other additives such like resin, natural detritus, mineral pigment and so on made by high vacuum pressing, doffing mould, drying and solidifying, calibrating, polishing and cutting. It is perfect materials for construction with light quality, high intensity, and high resistance to staining, corrosive, and easy construct since its nature stone texture and character which can be controlled by human. Quartz stone is widely used in kitchen counter top, counters in pubs and bars, washing basin counters, window counters, classical bathroom, wall and floor tiles, luxury commercial places(five-star hotels, official buildings, luxury showrooms, wall and floor in airport and bank), fashionable place (TV background walls, floor artistic panel and stair treads). Quartz stone has the below excellent properties: (1) The color, the texture and the decoration effect is as real as natural marble and natural granite. (2) High intensity, less thickness and light weight for constructing and sticking easily. (3) The aspect is unification especially for large area construct. (4) High surface rigidity, resistance abrasion, comparing beauty with natural granite. (5) High resistance aging, close to natural granite. (6) No toxic and environment friend.

What is Quartz Quartz (from German Quarz (help¡¤info)[1]) is the most abundant mineral in the Earth continental crust (although feldspar is more common in the world as a whole). It is made up of a lattice of silica (SiO2) tetrahedra. Quartz has a hardness of 7 on the Mohs scale and a density of 2.65 g/cm3.

Crystal habit
Quartz belongs to the rhombohedral crystal system. The ideal crystal shape is a six-sided prism terminating with six-sided pyramids at each end. In nature quartz crystals are often twinned, distorted, or so intergrown with adjacent crystals of quartz or other minerals as to only show part of this shape, or to lack obvious crystal faces altogether and appear massive. Well-formed crystals typically form in a "bed" that has unconstrained growth into a void, but because the crystals must be attached at the other end to a matrix, only one termination pyramid is present. A quartz geode is such a situation where the void is approximately spherical in shape, lined with a bed of crystals pointing inward.

Varieties
Pure quartz is colorless or white; colored varieties include rose quartz, amethyst, smoky quartz, milky quartz, and others. Quartz goes by an array of different names. The most important distinction between types of quartz is that of macrocrystalline (individual crystals visible to the unaided eye) and the microcrystalline or cryptocrystalline varieties (aggregates of crystals visible only under high magnification). Chalcedony is a generic term for cryptocrystalline quartz. The cryptocrystalline varieties are either translucent or mostly opaque, while the transparent varieties tend to be macrocrystalline.
Although many of the varietal names historically arose from the color of the mineral, current scientific naming schemes refer primarily to the microstructure of the mineral. Color is a secondary identifier for the cryptocrystalline minerals, although it is a primary identifier for the macrocrystalline varieties. This does not always hold true.

Synthetic and artificial treatments
A synthetic quartz crystal grown by the hydrothermal method, about 19 cm long and weighing about 127 grams.Not all varieties of quartz are naturally occurring. Prasiolite, an olive colored material, is produced by heat treatment; natural prasiolite has also been observed in Lower Silesia in Poland. Although citrine occurs naturally, the majority is the result of heat-treated amethyst. Carnelian is widely heat-treated to deepen its color.

Due to natural quartz being so often twinned, much of the quartz used in industry is synthesized. Large, flawless and untwinned crystals are produced in an autoclave via the hydrothermal process; emeralds are also synthesized in this fashion. While these are still commonly referred to as quartz, the correct term for this material is silicon dioxide.